Golden Trowel Award

We had a wonderful time Saturday September 15th, 2018. Honorable Brother Curtis Ogburn was awarded the Golden Trowel Award by Triune Masonic Lodge#15 & the Grand Lodge of Texas. Brother Ogburn was presented the award by his good friend Brother Dan Owczarzak, PM. Brother Ogburn is a 32° Scottish Rite Mason, Past President of MWSA District 39, Past Secretary of MWSA District 39, Past Master 3 times of Triune Lodge, active member of the Order of the Eastern Star, and Junior Past Master of Henry B Thomas Lodge. Brother Ogburn doesn’t just attend a couple meets here and there but he lives Freemasonry. Congratulations Brother!!!

 

Fraternally,

 

W. Badders

DDGM Official Visit

 

We had a great Official visit from RW Douglas Van Griner and District Instructor Merle Krueger. We also had 5 visiting Brothers, one of which came all the way from Ohio. We enjoyed fellowship during dinner. Thank you Worshipful Master for getting the cake. Brother Ogburn donated the wonderful brisket. The officer’s did a good job on their ritual. Thank you everyone that came out.

History of Triune No. 15

Triune Masonic Lodge History

Triune Lodge #15 AF & AM established and chartered in 1920.

In 1920, members of Anchor Lodge No. 424 and Alamo Lodge No. 44 wanted to form another Lodge that would be located in downtown San Antonio. In following weeks 23 members of Alamo Lodge No. 44 AF & AM submitted a petition to the Grand Lodge of Texas. Other lodges that supported the founding of Triune Lodge were San Antonio Lodge #1079, Anchor Lodge #424, Sinton Lodge #1012, Eagle Pass #626, Hiram Lodge #595, Aransas Pass #1018, and Floresville #515.

The Grand Lodge of Texas approved of the founding of the new lodge. The lodge name had two options which were Texas Lodge or Triune Lodge, Triune won by a little more than half the votes.

The first installation was held December 30, 1920 at The Masonic Temple which used to be on Loyosa & Crockett St. Listed brothers Installed
Worshipful Master – J.M. Strayhorn
Sr. Warden – D.N. Cushing
Jr. Warden – J.O. Spicler
Treasurer – W.A. Thurman
Secretary – John Lopas
Organist – C.C. Bonner
Sr. Deacon – C.W. Enders
Jr. Deacon – J.G. Jeffery
Sr. Steward – C.A. Knowlton
Jr. Steward – Dan Hill
Marshal – Carl Roemer
Tiler – J.R. Reynolds

The 1st Stated Meeting was held January 6, 1921, at 7:30pm. Eight officers, 29 members and 19 visitors were present. Eight petitions were received and two petitions for affiliation were also announced. The 2nd Stated Meeting was held January 20, 1921, approximately 324 members, officers, and visitors were in attendance. The lodge was so full they had to move it two blocks away to the Scottish Rite Cathedral.

By 1924 Triune Lodge had 158 members and was meeting at a site located at 613 1/2 Navarro St.

In 1927 Triune Lodge purchased 742 Denver Blvd. The stock market crash and the beginning of the Great Depression of 1929.

In 1933, five blue lodges and Triune pooled their assets and resources to form a confederation. Members of the confederation were Albert Pike Loge #1169, Community Lodge #1201, Perfect Union Lodge #10, San Antonio Lodge # 1079, Texas Lodge # 8 and Triune Lodge # 15. The confederation, known as the Masonic Center Company, was authorized by the Texas Secretary of State to issue nine shares of stock one for each of the Blue Lodges. In this way, lodges were able to remain solvent and continue with its Masonic work and activities. The listed lodges used the same building at 217 Camden St.

In 1941 after the USA was attacked members of Triune Lodge, along many other Americans, answered the call to serve and fight for their country. Brother Harty Williams P.M. was a Tch/Sgt who served with the U.S. Marines. Brother Lt. Col. P.C. Newman served in the U.S. Army and received 22 military commendations and awards. Many other from Triune Lodge answered the call for service to their country. Names of Triune Lodge members that served during World War II are listed in a special book located in the Flag Room of the Grand Lodge of Texas in Waco.

In 1940 membership was at 269 which reached 400 in 1945.

In 1948 fifty-six Master Masons of Triune Lodge signed a petition for the formation for Lonnie Irvin Daylight Lodge.

Through the efforts of the Masonic Fraternity, the Texas State Legislature established “Public Schools Week.” It called for the public to focus on the education and school activities of the youth in Texas. Triune Lodge was active in commemorating Public School Week. In 1956, a support group known as the Central Committee for Public Schools Week was established under the direction of Daniel Saenz, DDGM of District 39A. The committee’s main function was to provide resources as lodges planned their public schools week programs.

By 1957 the had 665 members.

Past Presidents of the Masters, Wardens and Secretaries Association of the 39th Masonic Districts
Listed Triune Members that served as President:
James F. Ward Jan-March 1946
Lum R. Holloway Oct-Dec 1952
Floyd James Griffin July-Sept 1954
Rudolph F. Workman Oct-Dec 1960
Earl G. Heaton Jan-June 1967
William D. Engle Jr Jan-June 1972
John Alexander Jan-June 1976
Thomas P. Lancaster 1980-1981
Hermon C. Colegrove 2002-2003
Curtis W. Ogburn 2012-2013

In January 21, 1960 Brother David Brinkley Burke who had been Secretary of Triune Lodge for 14 years was coronated as a Thirty-three (33rd Degree) Scottish Rite Mason. Brother Burke being the first Triune member to have his honor bestowed upon him.

Texas Masonic History

At a celebration of the Festival of St. John the Baptist in 1844 at Portland, Maine, R:.W:. Brother Teulon, a member of the Grand Lodge of Texas, in reply to a toast complimentary to the Masons of that Republic, observed “Texas is emphatically a Masonic country: all of our presidents and vice-presidents, and four-fifths of our state officers, were or are Masons; our national emblem, the ‘Lone Star,’ was chosen from among the emblems selected by Freemasonry, to illustrate the moral virtues — it is a five-pointed star, and alludes to the five points of fellowship.”

The first known Masonic meeting ever held in Texas was in February 1828 when Stephen F. Austin, Ira Ingram (who had his land in what would be Waller County) and 5 other masons met in San Felipe. They met to draw up a petition to get a dispensation to form new masonic lodge in San Felipe Texas. The petition was submited to the grand lodge in Mexico City. The petition was never acted on.

The second effort was organized in Brazoria County in March of 1835 for the purpose of establishing a lodge in Texas. After meeting under an oak tree near the town of Brazoria the six Masons attending decided to apply to the Grand Lodge of Louisiana for a dispensation to create a new lodge in Texas. After the dispensation was issued the first Texas lodge, called Holland Lodge No. 36, was formed and opened. It was named after John Henry Holland who was the Grand Master of Masons in Louisiana.

John M. Allen delivered the charter for the new lodge to Anson Jones, the first Worshipful Master of Holland Lodge No. 36, just before the battle begin at the San Jacinto battleground. Holland Lodge No. 36 was later changed to HollandNo. 1.

Two additionalTexas lodges were formed, and each given a dispensation and charter by the Grand Lodge of Louisiana. They were: Milam Lodge No. 40 in Nacogdoches, and McFarland Lodge No. 41 in San Augustine. Both of these lodges were formed in 1837. Representatives from the two new lodges, and Holland Lodge No. 36, met in Houston and established the Grand Lodge of the Republic of Texas. Anson Jones who was the fourth and final President of the Republic of Texas was elected as the first Grand Master of Masons in Texas.

By the time the first meeting of the Grand Lodge of the Republic of Texas was held in Houston on April 16, 1838 the list contained 25 lodges. The following is a list of those lodges:

Clarksville Orphan’s Friend No. 17 Holland No. 1
Houston Milam No. 2
Nacogdoches McFarland No. 3
San Augustine Temple No. 4
Houston St. John’s No. 5
Brazoria Harmony No. 6
Galveston Matagorda No. 7
Matagorda Phoenix No. 8
Washington DeKalb No. 9
DeKalb Perfect Union No. 10

*San Antonio Milam No. 11
Independence Austin No. 12
Austin Constantine No. 13
Bonham Trinity No. 14
Livingston Santa Fe No. 15
*Santa Fe (N.M.) Friendship No. 16
Anderson Washington No. 18
Washington Forrest No. 19
Huntsville Graham No. 20
Brenham Trinity No. 21
Crockett Marshall No. 22
Marshall Clinton No. 23
Henderson Red Land No. 24
San Augustine Montgomery No. 25
Montgomery

* Never chartered

From that meager beginning, Masonry in Texas has grown to 900 lodges with over 130,000 members.

Mastermason.com

Lodge Officers

Current Lodge Officers

Below are the San Antonio Masons who were made the current officers serving Triune Masonic Lodge #15 and Freemasonry in San Antonio.  The top ranking officers have served years of dedicated service to their lodge and their communities, to better themselves and enhance those whose lives they touch.  They, along with the Past Masters, mentor men new to the Fraternity, and those that are earlier on in their masonic career, in order to prepare them to lead the future of Triune Masonic Lodge #15.

FB_IMG_1532804126139

Worshipful Master:  William A. Badders, PM

Senior Warden: Warren Studdard, PM

Junior Warden:  Joe Rangel

Treasurer:  Barry L. Badders, PM

Secretary: T. Aaron Gonzalez, PM

Chaplain: Daniel Humada

Senior Deacon: Joshua Erosa

Junior Deacon: Gabe Vasquez

Senior Steward: Curtis Ogburn, PM

Master of Ceremonies: Gilbert Rodriguez Jr

Marshall: Brian Tawney, PM

Tiler: Tom L. Smith, PM

The current officers were installed on 15 July, 2019 at 1900 hrs.

Q & A about Masonry

Q:  What are the requirements for becoming a Mason?

A:

A candidate must be male, at least 18 years of age, a belief in a God, and be of good character.

 

Q:  Can atheists be a Mason?

A:

The only religious requirement is that candidates believe in a Supreme Being. If you can in good faith profess such a belief, you are eligible to be a Mason. No atheists will ever knowingly be made Masons. There are Catholic, Protestant, Mormon, Jewish, Buddhist, and Muslim Masons. It would be tedious and pointless to go into a religion-by-religion (and then denomination-by-denomination) discussion. The key points to remember are the requirement of belief in a Supreme Being and the fact that Masonry is a fraternity, not a religion.

 

Q:  Do Masons accept Catholics?

A:

Catholicism is only mentioned specifically because it has generated a lot of traffic in the past on the Masonic newsgroups. There is no prohibition in any Grand Lodge jurisdiction against Catholics being made Masons.

 

Q:  Do I have to be invited?

A:

Don’t wait to be invited. In fact,we’re waiting for you to ask!Traditionally Masons have never recruited members in order that a candidate might fully and honestly answer the first question in our ritual as to whether his request for membership is made of his “own free will and acccord.” Some men have never become Masons in the mistaken assumption that if no one asked them, they could not join. It’s up to YOU to take the initiative and ASK to become a Mason.

 

Q:  How many degrees are in Freemasonry?

A:

There are three degrees in the Blue Lodge which this lodge is. Master Masons (3rd degree) can take further degrees in the York Rite or/and Scottish Rite

 

Q:  Masonic Titles

A:

The words “worship” and “worshipful” as used in Freemasonry have no connection with their modern meaning of glorification, idolization, deification. In church the congregation worships God; in a lodge a brother is “Worshipful” when he is Master; in Grand Lodge a brother is “Most”, “Right”, or “Very Worshipful”, the words being used in the old English sense.

 

Q:  How do I proceed?

A:

If you know a Mason, ask him about membership. He will be glad to tell you all about the Craft and the local lodge, and he will give you a petition if you wish to join. If you do not know a Mason, drop a letter, make a call, or send an e-mail to us, and one of the officers will contact you. Please note: if you call the Lodge, you may not get an answer unless someone is actually there. Typically, the process is as follows: (A) The applicant fills out a petition. The petition requires you to have two sponsors from the lodge you’re seeking to join. If you don’t know anyone, arrangements will be made for you to meet and get to know someone willing to serve as your sponsor. This should not be an impediment to you. There are many, many Masons today who did not know another Mason when they first sought admission. (B) The petition is read at the lodge during the next business meeting, which for our Lodge is the 3rd Thursday of the month. A committee is formed to investigate the candidate. (Your sponsors will explain the schedule to you based on their knowledge of the Lodge’s meetings/events.) (C) The committee meets with the candidate to answer questions, ascertain that he meets the criteria for membership, and finds out a little more about him. This is not a “grilling session,” but rather a friendly and casual chat to make certain that the candidate has been properly informed about Masonry and that he was not improperly solicited. The committee also contacts the character references listed on the petition, typically asking if they know any reason why the candidate should not be accepted, etc. (D) The committee reports back to the Lodge during the next business meeting and the candidate is voted on. If accepted, someone from the Lodge contacts the candidate and informs him that he has been accepted and schedules a date for the Entered Apprentice degree. The process takes roughly 4 months. We’ll look forward to hearing from you!

 

Q:  Ceremonies and Degrees

A:

The experience of becoming a member of a Masonic Lodge is divided into three ceremonial stages that Masons call “degrees.” These three degrees are loosely based upon the journeyman system, which was used to educate Medieval craftsmen. Symbolically the degrees represent the three stages of human development: youth, manhood, and age.

The first degree of Freemasonry is the Entered Apprentice degree. It is a candidate’s first experience with the ceremonies of the fraternity and like all Masonic ceremonies is a solemn and meaningful event. Though new to Freemasonry, an Entered Apprentice enjoys the title of “Brother.”

The Fellow Craft degree is the second ceremony and exposes a Brother to more of the symbolism and philosophy of the fraternity. For skilled craftsmen this degree would have marked one’s progress from an apprentice to a journeyman.

The Master Mason degree is the last of the Lodge ceremonies and with it a candidate becomes a full member, enjoying both the rights and responsibilities of membership.

During all three ceremonies, a candidate is treated with complete respect. At no time, is he ever made to feel uncomfortable or harassed in anyway. Masonic ceremonies are a wonderful tradition shared by men such as George Washington, Harry S. Truman, Dave Thomas, and other men of integrity. These ceremonies are always conferred in such a way as to bring pride to the candidate and the members of the Lodge.

 

Q:  Ceremonies and Degrees

A:

The experience of becoming a member of a Masonic Lodge is divided into three ceremonial stages that Masons call “degrees.” These three degrees are loosely based upon the journeyman system, which was used to educate Medieval craftsmen. Symbolically the degrees represent the three stages of human development: youth, manhood, and age.

The first degree of Freemasonry is the Entered Apprentice degree. It is a candidate’s first experience with the ceremonies of the fraternity and like all Masonic ceremonies is a solemn and meaningful event. Though new to Freemasonry, an Entered Apprentice enjoys the title of “Brother.”

The Fellow Craft degree is the second ceremony and exposes a Brother to more of the symbolism and philosophy of the fraternity. For skilled craftsmen this degree would have marked one’s progress from an apprentice to a journeyman.

The Master Mason degree is the last of the Lodge ceremonies and with it a candidate becomes a full member, enjoying both the rights and responsibilities of membership.

 

Q:  Ceremonies and Degrees

A:  During all three ceremonies, a candidate is treated with complete respect. At no time, is he ever made to feel uncomfortable or harassed in anyway. Masonic ceremonies are a wonderful tradition shared by men such as George Washington, Harry S. Truman, Dave Thomas, and other men of integrity. These ceremonies are always conferred in such a way as to bring pride to the candidate and the members of the Lodge.

Activities and Calendar

Lodge Calendar

Monday
September 10, 2018
6:30 pm Meal
Esoteric Practice
Saturday             September 15, 2018 Golden Trowel Award Ceremony                      Noon Meal Ceremony 1:00pm
Thursday
September 20, 2018
Stated Meeting MM
6:30 pm Meal
7 pm Lodge Stated Meeting
 Monday
September 24, 2018
 6:30 pm Meal
Officer Meeting 6pm and Degree Team 7pm
 Monday
September 24, 2018
 6:30 pm Meal
Committee Updates
 Monday
October 8, 2018
 6:30 pm Meal
Esoteric Practice
 Thursday
October 18, 2018
Stated Meeting
6:30 pm Meal
7 pm Lodge Stated Meeting (Masonry in Cuba)
 Monday
October 22, 2018
 6:30 pm Meal
Esoteric Practice
 Monday
November 12, 2018
 6:30 pm Meal
Esoteric Practice
Thursday
November 15, 2018
 6:00 pm Meal George Washington Dinner/Potluck
7 pm Lodge Stated Meeting Guest Speaker
 Monday
November 26, 2018
 6:30 pm Meal
Esoteric Practice & Degree Team
 Monday
December 10, 2018
 6:30 pm Meal
Esoteric Practice
Thursday December 20, 2018  6:30 pm Meal
7 pm Stated Meeting Guest Speaker
Monday
January 7, 2019
6:30 pm Meal
Past Master’s Night
Monday
January 14, 2019
6:30 pm Meal
Esoteric Practice
Thursday
January 17, 2019
Dark
Grand Lodge Grand Communication 1/18-1/20

Charity

July 2018 Triune Masonic Lodge No. 15 donated $2,000 to St. Philip’s College for student scholarships

20180628_133029

June 2018 Triune Masonic Lodge No. 15 donated $1,020 to Boy Scout Troop 95 to attend Bear Creek Summer Camp

20180709_182222

May 2018 Triune Masonic Lodge No. 15 took Tooth Brush Kits to 3 Local Elementary Schools 1st Graders.

Triune Masonic Lodge

Triune Masonic Lodge

Welcome to the Triune Masonic Lodge No. 15 A.F. & A.M website.  We are a 98 year old lodge chartered by the Grand Lodge of Texas in 1920.  Our Stated meetings are held on the third Thursday of the month. We have an informal meal at 6:30pm, family and friends invited, and our Stated meetings start at 7:00pm.

Question: What is Freemasonry?

Answer: Freemasonry is a society that teaches a philosophy which gives each member the tools he needs to improve and become the best version of himself!

Above all, Freemasonry (or Masonry) reminds its members that there is more to life than the challenges they face each day.  Freemasonry encourages each man to worship and further their relationship with God but it does not dictate a path to salvation, as this is left to a Brothers Church, Temple, Mosque, etc. Freemasonry accepts men of all races and creeds, requiring only three beliefs that most men (and religions) agree upon; a belief in a supreme being, the divine authenticity of the holy scriptures (whatever your faith is), and life after death or the immortality of the soul.

People find Masonry hard to define because it encompasses so many areas…  history, philosophy, charity, ritual, etc…  but our favorite definition is “the Brotherhood of man under the Fatherhood of God!” After it has equipped a good man with the tools to improve himself, it surrounds him with other good men who are on the same journey! If you are interested in joining you should find a Masonic Lodge near you and ASK to join; you will never be asked by a Mason to join because each man must make that choice for himself.

If accepted, it will change your life for the better, as it leads to true friendships with good men and mentors you would have never known otherwise.

 

Taken from a writing by Brother Brad Billings